Putnam Aldrich

M, #14852, b. June 1834, d. 14 April 1867
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Putnam Aldrich was born in June 1834 in Lisbon, Grafton, New Hampshire. He was born on 27 June 1834; Description of Putnam(8) at age 28 yrs.- '5ft.10in,blue eyes,light complexion,sandy hair'- from Civil Warmilitary records. He married Amelia B. Young on 29 September 1864 in Littleton, Grafton, New Hampshire, by married by E.O.Kenney-Justice of the Peace.1 Putnam Aldrich married Lewella *Unknown*. Putnam Aldrich died on 14 April 1867 at age 32. He was buried in stone is lying flat,face up with a crack through it. stone reads........ PUTNAM ALDRICH died 14 April 1867 AE 32 yrs a member of the 5th Regt NH Vol LEWELLA wife of PUTNAM ALDRICH died July 3 1863 note: repaired crack running through Lewella's date of death. in Willow Cemetery, Franconia, Grafton, New Hampshire.
     He began military service; Putnam(8) enlisted in the Fifth Regiment New Hampshire VolunteerInfantry,Co.B at age 28 yrs. 'Aldrich,Putnam. Co.B;b.Lisbon;age 28;res,Franconia,cred.Franconia;enl.July28, '62;must. in Aug 19 '62,as Priv.Wd Sept 17, '62 ,Antietam,Md;July,'63 Gettysburg, Pa;disch.disab.Nov.20,'63,Concord.' 'At South Mountain the Fifth was in the reserve; but at Boonsborough,September 15, it was in the advance of the army, and two days laterperformed marked service at Antietam, losing in killed and wounded more than one third of those present. Inthe official reports, the Fifth is given the credit of havingdiscovered and frustrated the attempt of the enemy to turn the left ofthe Second Corps.' WILLIAM EARLE(11) ALDRICH,Jr.,of Needham,Mass.,has in hispossession PUTNAM(8)'s Civil War hat and a belt belonging to PUTNAM(8)'scommanding officer,Lt.Col.Charles E.Hapgood.The belt might have beenused as a tourniquet on PUTNAM(8)'s wounds while in the battlefield! American Civil War Battle Summaries ANTIETAM, MD. SETP. 16-17TH, 1862 Antietam, Md., Sept. 16-17, 1862. Army of the Potomac. In his report of the battle of South Mountain, which was fought on the14th, Gen. Meade says: 'The command rested on their arms during thenight. The ammunition train was brought up and the men's cartridge-boxes were filled, and every preparationmade to renew the contest at daylight the next morning should theenemy be in force. Unfortunately, the morning opened with a heavy mist, which prevented any view beingobtained, so that it was not until 7 a. m. that it was ascertainedthat the enemy had retired from the mountain.' As soon as this discovery was made the whole Union army began pouringthrough the passes of South Mountain in pursuit. At BoonsboroPleasonton's cavalry came up with the Confederate rear guard. The 8th Ill., which was in the advance, immediatelycharged and then pursued the retreating enemy for a distance of 2miles. There the Illinois regiment was joined by a section ofTidball's battery, which threw a few shells into the Confederatelines, completely routing the enemy from the field. The Union loss inthis skirmish was 1 killed and 15 wounded, while the Confederates left30 killed and 50 wounded on the field, and a number of prisoners weretaken. About the time this engagement commenced another was takingplace on the Sharpsburg road, between the Confederate rear and the 5thN. H. infantry. This skirmish lasted until 9 p. m., when the NewHampshire troops were relieved, after losing 4 men in killed andwounded. The enemy's loss here was 12 killed and wounded and 60prisoners. The 2nd Del. and 52nd N. Y. also skirmished with the rearguard at other points, and in the afternoon the Confederates opened aheavy artillery fire on the Federal advance near Antietam creek,keeping it up until after dark. This was replied to by Tidball's horseartillery and Battery B, 1st N. Y. light artillery, from the heightseast of the creek. McClellan's hope was to bring on an engagement before the Confederateforces could be united. Lee, on the other hand, was bending everyeffort to concentrate his army in time to resist the general attackwhich he now realized was imminent. Stonewall Jackson, with his owndivision and those of Ewell and A. P. Hill, was at Harper's Ferry.McLaws, after his defeat at Crampton's pass on the 14th, formed his forces across thelower end of Pleasant Valley, while the Union forces under Gen.Franklin confronted him at the upper end of the valley, about 2 milesdistant. Here the two lay all day on the 15th, each supposing theother to be superior in strength and neither daring to attack. Themorning of the 16th found Longstreet and D. H. Hill occupying aposition on the west side of the Antietam, between that stream and thelittle town of Sharpsburg. Here Lee personally directed the movementsof his army, selecting the strongest possible ground to withstand anattack until the detachments under Jackson and McLaws could be unitedwith the main body. Soon after crossing the Antietam Lee learned thatthe Federal garrison at Harper's Ferry had surrendered, and sentorders for the whole force near the ferry to move at once toSharpsburg. The Army of the Potomac at this time was organized asfollows: The 1st army corps, commanded by Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker, consisted ofthe divisions of Doubleday, Ricketts and Meade; the 2nd corps,Maj.Gen. Edwin V. Sumner, included Richardson's, Sedgwick's and French's divisions; Couch's division ofthe 4th corps, the 5th corps, Maj.-Gen. Fitz John Porter, was composedof the divisions of Morell Sykes and Humphreys; the 6th corps,Maj.-Gen. William B. Franklin, embraced the divisions of Slocum and W.F. Smith , the 9th corps, Maj.-Gen Ambrose E. Burnside consisted ofthe divisions of Willcox, Sturgis and Rodman, and the Kanawhadivision, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox , the 12th corps,Maj.-Gen. Joseph K. F. Mansfield, included the divisions of Williamsand Greene; the cavalry division numbering five brigades and commandedby Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasonton, and over 50 batteries of artillery.In his report of the campaign McClellan gives the number of his forcesat 87,164. Lee, in his official report on the battle of Antietam,says: 'This great battle was fought by less than 40,000 men on ourside ' The Confederate line of battle on the 16th extended from the Potomac,at a point a little below Mercersville, to the Antietam about a milebelow Sharpsburg. It was nearly four miles long and occupied a brokencountry, the low hills being separated by narrow valleys, while almosteverywhere the limestone cropped out above the surface, affording anatural shelter for the troops. In front the line was protected by theAntietam, which was crossed by three bridges and severalfords, thoughthe latter were all too difficult to attempt a crossing withartillery. Near the south end of Lee's line was the bridge afterwardknown as the 'Burnside bridge;' on the Sharpsburg and Boonsboro road,near the center of the line, was the second bridge, while the thirdwas the stone bridge on the Williamsport road still further north.Near the mouth of the stream was a fourth bridge, but it was not usedduring the operations, except by A. P. Hill in bringing up hisdivision from Harper's Ferry. On the Hagerstown pike, about a milefrom Sharpsburg, stood the Dunker church in the edge of a patch oftimber, since known as the 'West woods.' At the church the Smoketownroad leaves the pike, and about half a mile north on this road were some more timber patches called the 'Eastwoods.' In forming his line Lee posted Longstreet on the right, so asto cover the Burnside bridge, and D. H. Hill on the left, covering the bridge on the Boonsboro road. On theopposite side of the Antietam lay the Union army with the 1st corps onthe extreme right and the 9th on the left. McClellan established his headquarters at the Pry house, a shortdistance northwest of the Boonsboro road and near the center of hisline. Lee's headquarters were at the west side of Sharpsburg on theroad leading to Shepherdstown. Shortly after 1 p. m. on the 16th Hooker received orders to cross theAntietam and attack the Confederate left. Meade's and Ricketts,divisions crossed at the stone bridge and Doubleday's at the ford justbelow. Once across the stream he turned to the right in order to gainthe watershed between the Antietam and Potomac, intending to followthe ridge until he gained the enemy's left flank. Some skirmishingoccurred along the line of march, and information of Hooker'smovements was at once carried to Lee. At the time the messengerarrived Lee was in council with Longstreet and Jackson, who hadarrived from Harper's Ferry that morning. Lee immediately orderedJackson to the command of the left wing and Hood's command was movedfrom the center to a position near the Dunker church. A little whilebefore sunset Hooker pushed forward a battery and opened fire onJackson's left. The fire was promptly returned and the artillery duelwas continued until after dark, when the corps went into bivouac ashort distance north of the East woods, where the men rested on theirarms during the night, ready to begin the attack the next morning. Allthat night there was desultory firing between the pickets, who were soclose to each other that at times their footsteps could be heard.During the night Mansfield's corps was sent over to the assistance ofHooker and about 2 a. m. on the 17th took up a position on thePoffenberger farm, about a mile in Hooker's rear. As soon as it waslight enough to distinguish objects on the morning of the 17th theFederal skirmishers began their work in the East woods. Soon afterwardthe entire corps was thrown into line with Doubleday on the right,Ricketts on the left, and Meade in reserve in the center, withinstructions to reinforce either of the other divisions ascircumstances might require. Thus formed the whole line moved forwardand the real battle of Antietam was begun. In the triangular spacebetween the Hagerstown and Smoketown roads, and directly in front ofHooker, was a 30-acre field of corn in which the enemy had stationed a large force of infantry during the night. Before thisforce fired a shot its presence was discovered by the sun's rays onthe bayonets, and in his report Hooker says: 'Instructions wereimmediately given for the assemblage of all my spare batteries, nearat hand, of which I think there were five or six, to spring intobattery, on the right of this field, and to open with canister atonce. In the time 1 am writing every stalk of corn in the northern andgreater part of the field was cut as closely as could have been donewith a knife, and the slain lay in rows precisely as they had stood intheir ranks a few moments before.It was never my fortune to witness amore bloody, dismal battle-field.' The survivors beat a rapid retreattoward the church and there sought shelter behind rocks, trees andstone fences. The Union men pressed forward in close pursuit for somedistance, but the Confederates were rallied and reinforced, when theFederals were in turn forced to fall back. At this juncture Mansfield arrived, but while deploying his men hefell mortally wounded and the command of the corps fell on Gen.Williams, who had barely time to receive a few general instructions from Hooker before he was forced to go into thefight. Not knowing the exact position of the 1st corps there was somelack of unity in the movements of the various division commanders, butafter nearly two hours of hard fighting the enemy was driven back tothe West woods. Greene's division succeeded in turning Jackson's rightand in gaining a position in the edge of the woods near the Dunkerchurch, where he hung on tenaciously, repulsing several attempts todislodge him. In this part of the engagement the Confederates sufferedseverely. J. .R Jones, who was in command of Jackson's division, waswounded. Starke, who succeeded him, was soon afterward killed. Lawtonthen took command of the division and was wounded and borne from thefield. Nearly one-half the entire force on the Confederate left werekilled or wounded, and it is probable that if Sumner had arrived atthis time the entire Confederate army could have been crushed. It wasnearly 10 o'clock, however, before Sumner's corps, some 18,000 strong,reached the field, coming on in three columns. Sedgwick on the rightoccupied the position from which Hooker had been driven earlier in theaction. Next came the divisions of French and Richardson, the Unionline now being extended well down toward the Boonsboro road.Sedgwick's division went into battle in three lines. The first hadhardly become engaged when the Confederates made a desperate rush, broke through the Union line and turned Sedgwick'sleft. The third line was quickly faced about to repel an attack fromthe rear, but the Confederate fire on the left was so effective thatthe entire division was forced to retire. Here Sedgwick was wounded,but he remained in the saddle until his command was rallied and placedin a strong position, where, under the command of Gen. Howard, itremained throughout the rest of the battle. The battle was gradually moving southward and after ten o'clock therewas no more serious fighting north of the church. About half a milesouth of the church a road leaves the pike and, following a zigzagcourse, strikes the Boonsboro road about half-way between Sharpsburgand the Antietam. For some distance after leaving the pike this roadwas lower than the ground on either side, forming a naturalbreastwork, and was known as the sunken road. It was toward this roadthat French and Richardson directed their movements. When Lee saw that his left was defeated and his center in danger of being broken,he brought up every available man from his right. In quick successionthe divisions of Walker, Anderson and McLaws were hurled againstSumner's veterans. Sumner was reinforced by part of Mansfield's corpsand the Confederates were slowly forced back every foot of the groundbeing stubbornly contested, until their final stand was made at thesunken road. In this part of the engagement the heavy guns of theUnion batteries east of the Antietam rendered important service bypreventing the enemy from using his artillery. D. H. Hill, whocommanded this part of the Confederate line, says: 'Our artillerycould not cope with the superior weight, caliber, range and number of the Yankee guns. They were smashed up orwithdrawn before they could be turned against the massive columns ofattack.' At last Col. Barlow, commanding the 1st brigade of Richardson's division, made a successfulflank movement on the road and captured about 300 men who still clungto it, more as a place of shelter than in the hope of checking the Federal advance. The road was filled withConfederate dead and is referred to in all descriptions of the battleas the 'Bloody Lane.' In his report of the battle of Antietam McClellan says: 'My plan forthe impending general engagement was to attack the enemy's left withthe corps of Hooker and Mansfield, supported by Sumner's, and if necessary by Franklin's and as soon asmatters looked favorably there to move the corps of Burnside againstthe enemy's extreme right upon the ridge running to the south and rearof Sharpsburg, and having carried their position, to press along thecrest toward our right, and whenever either of these flank movementsshould be successful, to advance our center with all the forces thendisposable.' In pursuance of this plan the 9th corps was stationed onthe Federal left, with instructions to assault and carry the Burnsidebridge whenever an order to that effect should be issued fromheadquarters. McClellan says that this order was sent to Burnside at 8a. m. on the 17th, while the latter says he received it 'about teno'clock.' The bridge was guarded by Toombs, brigade, which occupied astrong position among the rocks and trees on the bluff commanding thewest end of the bridge, while the bridge, the ford below, and in fact,the entire valley, were all effectually covered by the Confederatebatteries. The first attempt to carry the bridge was made by Crook's brigade of the Kanawha division, with the11th Conn. deployed as skirmishers to cover the advance. The plan wasto move the brigade across the bridge in two columns of fours, which were to turn to the right and left assoon as they reached the opposite bank, Rodman's division meanwhile totry to cross at a ford about a third of a mile farther down the creek. This plan failed because Crook missedhis way and reached the stream some distance above the bridge, wherehe became engaged with the enemy on the west bank. A second effort,made by the 2nd Md. and 6th N. H. infantry, likewise proved a failure.The two regiments charged across the bridge with fixed bayonets, butwere met by a withering fire of artillery and musketry and forced to fall back.Gen. Cox, to whom Burnside had entrusted the work of carrying thebridge, then directed Gen. Sturgis to select two regiments fromFerrero,s brigade and push them across the bridge in accordance withthe first plan. Sturgis selected the 51st N. Y. and the 51st Penn. Ahowitzer from Simmonds, battery was brought forward and placed whereit covered the west end of the bridge. When everything was inreadiness the strong skirmish line opened fire, the howitzer wasoperated rapidly, throwing double charges of canister into the ranks of Toombs'men, and under this protection the two regiments advanced at thedouble-quick with fixed bayonets and dashed across the bridge, the Confederates hastily retreating before theimpetuous charge. The remainder of Sturgis, division and Crook'sbrigade were hurried over to the support of the two gallant regiments, and these were soon further strengthened byRodman's division and Scammon's brigade, which had succeeded incrossing at the ford. Here another delay ensued. Sturgis' and Crook'smen had almost exhausted their ammunition and a halt was madenecessary until their cartridge-boxes were replenished. During thepause Willcox's division and several light batteries were broughtover, the remaining batteries being planted on the hills east of thecreek, and at 3 p.m. the left wing began its advance on Sharpsburg.The Confederates under D. R. Jones were soon encountered, drawn updiagonally across the ridge, screened by stone fences, etc., and wellsupported by artillery. Welsh's and Christ's brigades, which were inadvance, drove them back after some sharp fighting, until near theedge of the village, where Jones made his final stand in an oldorchard. From this position he was routed by the batteries withWillcox's division and the orchard was occupied by the infantry. Inthe advance Rodman's division formed the extreme left, and as themovement was made in the form of a right wheel he became separatedfrom Willcox, causing a break in the line and throwing Rodman'sbrigades en echelon. To the south was a field of tall corn, throughwhich A. P. Hill's division, just up from Harper's Ferry, wasadvancing in line of battle to strike the left flank. They wore theblue uniforms captured at the ferry and it was thought they were partof the Union forces until they opened fire. Scammon quickly faced his brigade to the left and held Hill in check until the line could bereformed. In order to do this it was necessary for Willcox and Crookto retire somewhat from their advanced position, while Sturgis came upwith his command to fill the break in the line. This gave Jones anopportunity to retire beyond Sharpsburg and take a position on thehigh ground where the national cemetery is now located, but it nodoubt saved Rodman's division from being cut to pieces. This virtuallyended the battle of Antietam, and at the close the two armies held thesame relative positions they occupied at the commencement of thefight. The Union loss was 2,108 killed, 9,549 wounded and 753 captured ormissing. According to Confederate reports Lee's army lost 1,512killed, 7,816 wounded and 1,844 captured or missing, a much greaterloss in proportion to the number of troops engaged than that inflictedon the Federal forces. Both sides claimed a victory and the engagementmight well be designated as a drawn battle. The 18th was spent by botharmies in resting the tired troops and in caring for the dead andwounded. McClellan's intention was to renew the fight on the 19th, butwhen the sun rose that morning it was discovered that the enemy hadevacuated his position during the night, crossed the Potomac at a fordsome distance below the Shepherdstown road, and retired into Virginia.Lee's invasion of Maryland was ended. Source: The Union Army, vol. 5. He was a collier (charcoal maker) Ancestry.com US Census for Franconia image # 4 lists his occupation as ' Collier ', which is a charcoal makerprobably for the Franconia Iron Works.****************** http://www.allroutes.to/franconia/ironfurnace/ Nearly all of the trees in the area were cut down to make charcoal tofuel the furnace. A man who made charcoal was called a collier. He cut down trees, sawedthe wood into short lengths, split the logs and stacked them around acenter opening -- all by hand, with a saw and an ax. He placed layer upon layer of wood to form a mound, then covered themound with leaves, branches and charcoal dust to make it airtight,before igniting through the center hole. The collier had to watch his charcoal heap closely -- day and night --for two weeks, while it smouldered. He got little sleep. If the firebroke into flames, all of his work would be lost. Every day the collier had to climb up the mound and jump on it to seeif the wood was burning too much. He carried a long pole crosswise, sothat he could pull himself out if he fell into the burning mound. in 1860.2 He was a cooper received a lot of info on Amelia B.Young from NikisGrand@AOL.com whosegrt grandmother,Cilivia Olive Young, was Amelia's sister. around 1864. Putnam Aldrich appeared as the Head of Household on the census of 1860 US Census in Franconia, Grafton, New Hampshire. Ancestry.com image # 4 image # 11 shows him living with his brother William E.(8) Aldrich andwife Almeda. Putnam Aldrich appeared as the Head of Household on the census of 1850 US Census in Franconia, Grafton, New Hampshire. Ancestry.com image # 11. He was ill with Putnam(8)died from chronic cough and lung diease. He also had a badleg due to wounds he got in the battle of Antietam.

Citations

  1. [S315] Declaration of Widow's Pension.
  2. [S1134] Ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census.

Simon Aldrich

M, #14853, b. 1816
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Simon Aldrich was born in 1816 in Lisbon, Grafton, New Hampshire. He married Martha Carlton.
     Simon Aldrich appeared as the Head of Household on the census of 1880 US Census in Somerville, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Household Record 1880 United States Census Search results | Download Previous Household Next Household -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Household: Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace OccupationFather's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace Simon ALDRICH Self W Male W 59 NH U. S. Appraiser NHNH Albert C. ALDRICH Son S Male W 22 NH Student NH NH Chas. W. HALE SonL M Male W 33 CT Merchant Taylor NYCT Josephine E. HALE Dau M Female W 24 NH Keeping HouseNH NH Martha L. HALE GDau S Female W 1 MA CT NH -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Source Information: Census Place Somerville, Middlesex, Massachusetts Family History Library Film 1254546 NA Film Number T9-0546 Page Number 269D.

Children of Simon Aldrich and Martha Carlton

William Aldrich

M, #14854, b. 13 January 1731/32, d. 9 September 1803
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     William Aldrich was born on 13 January 1731/32 in Uxbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts.1 He married Dinah Aldrich, daughter of Edward Aldrich and Dinah Aldrich, on 10 November 1754 in Uxbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, by Note: Dinah of Glocester. Intentions 10 Nov 1754 in Douglas. William Aldrich died on 9 September 1803 at age 71 in Sugar Hill, Grafton, New Hampshire.2 He was buried in Sunnyside Cemetery, Sugar Hill, Grafton, New Hampshire.
     During his Military Service he: Revolutionary War Record Massachusetts Soldiers & Sailors in the War of the Revolution, 17 Vols Volume 1 page 117 Aldrich, William, Richmond, N. H.Capt. Oliver Capron's co., Col.Ephraim Doolittle's (24th) regt; receipt for advance pay dated Campat Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also, Private; muster roll dated Aug. 1,1775; enlisted May 16, 1775; service, 2 mos. 21 days; also, companyreturn [probably Oct., 1775]; also, order for bounty coat or itsequivalent in money, dated Winter Hill, Nov. 19, 1775. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?DB=MASOLD&GS=ALDRICH&SRVR=SEARCH&SE=SSE.DLL&QUERY=ALDRICH&DATABASEID=3090&TITLE=MASSACHUSETTS+SOLDIERS+%26+SAILORS+IN+THE+WAR+OF+THE+REVOLUTION%2C+17+VOLS.&DATABASENAME=MASOLD&SEARCHENGINE=SSE.DLL&SERVER=SEARCH&TYPE=P&fh=50 On 6 Oct 1775,WILLIAM(5) joined Col.Ephraim Doolittle's Regiment inRichmond,NH and served as a private during the Revolutionary War.Hesaw battle at Winter Hill. REVOLUTIONARY WAR ROLLS COLONEL EPHRAIM DOOLITTLE'S REGIMENT CAPTAIN OLIVER CAPRON'S COMPANY WINTER HILL OCTOBER 6,1775 RICHMOND,N.H.MEN Capt.Oliver CapronLieut.David Barney Serg.Henry IngallsSerg.Rufus Whipple Serg.Ezra PrattSerg.David Russell Corp.Hezekiah Thurber Corp.JamesWestcoat Solomon Aldrich WILLIAM ALDRICH NathanBarrus Jeremiah Barrus William BarneySamuel Carpenter Othaniel Day John EllisJohn Garnsey Abial Knap Eleazar MartinEli Page Jeremiah Thayer Nehemiah Thayer JohnWollery Constant White Daniel PetersIsrael Peters Timothy Robinson David Shearman.

Children of William Aldrich and Dinah Aldrich

Citations

  1. [S44] James N. Arnold, Uxbridge VR, Abbrev: Uxbridge VR Title: Vital Records of Uxbridge, Massachusetts, to the Year 1850 Author: Thomas W. Baldwin Publication: Wright & Potter Printing Company, Boston, 1916 CD images by Search & ReSearch, Inc., Wheatridge, CO, 1999 Page: p. 22, Uxbridge Births.
  2. [S156] Cemetery Records.
  3. [S23] Alvin James Aldrich, George Aldrich Genealogy, V1 p80.
  4. [S23] Alvin James Aldrich, George Aldrich Genealogy, V1 p81.

George S. Kiel1

M, #14855, b. circa 1896
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     George S. Kiel was born circa 1896 in Kansas.1

Citations

  1. [S272] Ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census.

Harold Carlton Gordon

M, #14856, b. 22 August 1884, d. 11 October 1954
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Harold Carlton Gordon was born on 22 August 1884 in New Hampton, Belknap, New Hampshire. He married Minnie May Woodmancy, daughter of George Alfred Woodmancy and Mary Isabel Aldrich, on 18 September 1907. Harold Carlton Gordon died on 11 October 1954 at age 70.
     Harold Carlton Gordon appeared as the Head of Household on the census of 1920 US Census in Alexandria, Grafton, New Hampshire. Ancestry.com image # 9. He was a farmer in 1920 at Alexandria, Grafton, New Hampshire.

Child of Harold Carlton Gordon and Minnie May Woodmancy

Mary Isabel Gordon

F, #14857
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron

Child of Mary Isabel Gordon and Roger Orville Rand

Mercelia Ione Howland

F, #14858, b. 4 April 1842, d. 11 December 1871
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Mercelia Ione Howland was born on 4 April 1842 in Lisbon, Grafton, New Hampshire.1 She married Henry Earl Aldrich, son of Alton Aldrich and Mary Polly Earle, on 15 August 1860. Mercelia Ione Howland died on 11 December 1871 at age 29. She was buried in Sunnyside Cemetery, Sugar Hill, Grafton, New Hampshire.
     Her married name was Aldrich.

Children of Mercelia Ione Howland and Henry Earl Aldrich

Citations

  1. [S156] Cemetery Records.

Mehitable Moody

F, #14859, b. 1820, d. 1903
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Mehitable Moody was born in 1820. She married Jethro Aldrich, son of Jethro Aldrich and Elizabeth Applebee, on 7 December 1837 in Lisbon, Grafton, New Hampshire. Mehitable Moody died in 1903. She was buried in Sunnyside Cemetery, Sugar Hill, Grafton, New Hampshire.
     Her married name was Aldrich.

Children of Mehitable Moody and Jethro Aldrich

Daughter Rand

F, #14860
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron

Child of Daughter Rand and Mr. Cross

Citations

  1. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Hosking-Hosken Tree on Ancestry.com owned by user DorothyHHuntley. Info extracted on 13 Sep 2008.

George Alfred Woodmancy

M, #14861, b. 2 June 1861, d. 1948
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     George Alfred Woodmancy was born on 2 June 1861 in North Scituate, Providence, Rhode Island. He married Mary Isabel Aldrich, daughter of Henry Earl Aldrich and Mercelia Ione Howland, on 14 November 1883 in Saint Paul's Episcopal Church, Pawtucket County, Rhode Island. George Alfred Woodmancy and Mary Isabel Aldrich were divorced circa 1888. George Alfred Woodmancy died in 1948 in Foster, Providence, Rhode Island.
     George Alfred Woodmancy appeared as the Head of Household on the census of 1920 in Killingly, Windham, Connecticut.1

Children of George Alfred Woodmancy and Mary Isabel Aldrich

Citations

  1. [S1132] Ancestry.com, 1920 United States Federal Census.

Minnie May Woodmancy

F, #14862, b. 9 September 1886, d. 1 May 1968
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Minnie May Woodmancy was born on 9 September 1886 in Pawtucket, Providence, Rhode Island. She married Harold Carlton Gordon on 18 September 1907. Minnie May Woodmancy died on 1 May 1968 at age 81 in Meredith, Belknap, New Hampshire.
     Her married name was Gordon. She was also known as Morrison.1

Child of Minnie May Woodmancy and Harold Carlton Gordon

Citations

  1. [S272] Ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census.

Lorette Keller

F, #14864
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron

Alfe Capron

F, #14865, b. 11 October 1835, d. 18 October 1912
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Alfe Capron; Montrose Cemetery, Norton, Summit, Ohio
     Alfe Capron was born on 11 October 1835 in Bath, Summit, Ohio.1 She died on 18 October 1912 at age 77 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 She was buried in Montrose Cemetery, Norton, Summit, Ohio.2
     She appeared on the census of 1850 at Bath, Summit, Ohio, as the son of the head of the household, Comfort Capron.3

Citations

  1. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 1953480
    Digital Folder #: 4021222.
  2. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.
  3. [S155] Ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census.

Gilbert G. Kilburn1

M, #14866, b. circa 1865
ChartsDescendants of Hannah Capron
     Gilbert G. Kilburn was born circa 1865 in Vermont.1

Citations

  1. [S161] Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1880 United States Federal Census.

George Capron

M, #14867, b. 1825, d. 31 January 1853
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     George Capron was born in 1825 in Bath, Summit, Ohio. He died on 31 January 1853.
     He appeared on the census of 1850 at Bath, Summit, Ohio, as the son of the head of the household, Comfort Capron.1

Citations

  1. [S155] Ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census.

Otis Capron

M, #14868, b. 1826, d. 21 May 1847
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Otis Capron was born in 1826 in Bath, Summit, Ohio. He died on 21 May 1847 in Mexico.

Sarah Capron

F, #14869, b. 1833, d. 25 February 1861
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Sarah Capron Parker; Montrose Cemetery, Norton, Summit, Ohio
     Sarah Capron was born in 1833. She married Henry A. Parker. Sarah Capron died on 25 February 1861. She was buried in Montrose Cemetery, Norton, Summit, Ohio.1
     Her married name was Parker. She appeared on the census of 1850 at Bath, Summit, Ohio, as the daughter of the head of the household, Comfort Capron.2

Child of Sarah Capron and Henry A. Parker

Citations

  1. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S155] Ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census.

Welcome Capron

M, #14870, b. 1831, d. 22 January 1853
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Welcome Capron was born in 1831 in Bath, Summit, Ohio. He died on 22 January 1853 in California.
     He appeared on the census of 1850 at Bath, Summit, Ohio, as the son of the head of the household, Comfort Capron.1

Citations

  1. [S155] Ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census.

Mary Ann Osmun

F, #14871, b. 1805, d. 9 August 1890
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Mary A. Capron; Montrose Cemetery, Norton, Summit, Ohio
     Mary Ann Osmun was born in 1805 in New Jersey.1 She married Comfort Capron, son of Orlin Capron and Ama Carpenter, circa 1824. Mary Ann Osmun died on 9 August 1890 in Bath, Summit, Ohio.2 She was buried in Montrose Cemetery, Norton, Summit, Ohio.2
     Her married name was Capron. She appeared on the census of 1850 at Bath, Summit, Ohio, as the wife of the head of the household, Comfort Capron.1

Children of Mary Ann Osmun and Comfort Capron

Citations

  1. [S155] Ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census.
  2. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.
  3. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 1984017
    Digital Folder #: 4021598.

Louise Parker

F, #14872, b. 13 February 1860, d. 9 May 1952
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Louise Parker was born on 13 February 1860 in Copley, Summit, Ohio.1 She died on 9 May 1952 at age 92 in Cuyahoga Falls, Summit, Ohio.1

Citations

  1. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 2246297
    Digital Folder #: 4109422.

Adelaide Allyn

F, #14873, b. 23 July 1848, d. 21 May 1896
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Adelaide (Allyn) Barber; Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, OH
     Adelaide Allyn was born on 23 July 1848 in Summit County, Ohio. She married Preston Barber on 20 February 1866 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 Adelaide Allyn died on 21 May 1896 at age 47 in Akron, Summit, Ohio. She was buried in Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, Ohio.2
     Her married name was Barber. She was also known as Adeline Allyn.

Children of Adelaide Allyn and Preston Barber

Citations

  1. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Stuart Steingraber e-mail address.
  2. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.

Charles G. Allyn

M, #14874, b. 25 May 1851, d. 27 December 1910
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Charles G. Allyn; Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, OH
     Charles G. Allyn was born on 25 May 1851 in Summit County, Ohio.1 He married Ada Vail on 10 September 1873 in Summit County, Ohio.2 Charles G. Allyn married Margaret Milne in 1884.3 Charles G. Allyn died on 27 December 1910 at age 59 in Portage, Wood, Ohio.1 He was buried in Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, Ohio.4

Children of Charles G. Allyn and Margaret Milne

Citations

  1. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 1952769
    Digital Folder #: 4021040.
  2. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Stuart Steingraber e-mail address.
  3. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Jim Casadevall e-mail address.
  4. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.

Etta Allyn

F, #14875, b. 28 January 1863
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Etta Allyn was born on 28 January 1863 in Akron, Summit, Ohio. She married Augustus F. Wooster circa 1880. Etta Allyn married Austin F. Wooster circa 1893 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.
     Her married name was Wooster.

Child of Etta Allyn and Augustus F. Wooster

Child of Etta Allyn and Austin F. Wooster

Gertrude Allyn

F, #14876, b. 24 November 1869, d. 8 September 1945
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Gertrude (Allyn) Gladwin; Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, OH
     Gertrude Allyn was born on 24 November 1869 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 She married Stephen Gladwin circa 1880. Gertrude Allyn died on 8 September 1945 at age 75 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 She was buried in Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, Ohio.2
     Gertrude Allyn's DAR National number is 79553.3

     Biographical Notes for Gertrude Allyn: Descendant of Col. Nathan Gallup, of Connecticut.
Daughter of Abel Gallup Allyn (1820-1906) and Adeline Capron (1828-88), his wife, m. 1847.
Granddaughter of Israel Allyn and Lucy Gallup, his wife.
Gr-granddaughter of Jacob Gallup and Rebecca Morgan, his wife.
Gr-gr-granddaughter of Nathan Gallup and Sarah Giddings, his wife.
Nathan Gallup (1727-99) served as lieutenant-colonel in Sullivan's expedition to Rhode Island, 1778, and, 1780, commanded a regiment. He was born and died in Groton, Conn.
Also Nos. 17230, 58194.3 Her married name was Gladwin.

Child of Gertrude Allyn and Stephen Gladwin

Citations

  1. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 2372584
    Digital Folder #: 4072474.
  2. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.
  3. [S35] Various records of the DAR. Specific source in the record for the person., National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 80 page 199.

Ida Allyn

F, #14877, b. 15 February 1854, d. 19 February 1916
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
Ida (Allyn) McCoy; Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, OH
     Ida Allyn was born on 15 February 1854 in Summit County, Ohio. She married States A. McCoy circa 1873.1 Ida Allyn died on 19 February 1916 at age 62 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.2 She was buried in Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit, Ohio.3
     Her married name was McCoy. She appeared on the census of 1880 at Norton, Summit, Ohio, as the wife of the head of the household, States A. McCoy.4

Children of Ida Allyn and States A. McCoy

Citations

  1. [S1152] Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census.
  2. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 1983645
    Digital Folder #: 4021390.
  3. [S938] Find A Grave, online www.findagrave.com.
  4. [S161] Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1880 United States Federal Census.

Leora Allyn

F, #14878, b. 14 May 1860, d. 19 January 1921
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Leora Allyn was born on 14 May 1860 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 She married Charles Tuttle Parks circa 1875. Leora Allyn died on 19 January 1921 at age 60 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1
     Biographical Notes for Leora Allyn: Descendant of Col. Nathan Gallup.
Daughter of Abel Gallup Allyn (1820-1906) and Adeline Capron (1828-88), his wife, m. 1847.
See No. 79553.2 Leora Allyn's DAR National number is 79554.2 Her married name was Parks.

Citations

  1. [S982] Family Search, Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953
    Film #: 1991487
    Digital Folder #: 4022187.
  2. [S35] Various records of the DAR. Specific source in the record for the person., National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 80 page 199.

Eva May Barber

F, #14879, b. 6 April 1873, d. 7 October 1963
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Eva May Barber was born on 6 April 1873 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 She married William Sherbondy.1 Eva May Barber died on 7 October 1963 at age 90 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.1
     Her married name was Sherbondy.

Child of Eva May Barber and William Sherbondy

Citations

  1. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Stuart Steingraber e-mail address.

Frederick Barber1

M, #14880, b. 8 May 1870, d. 22 April 1929
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Frederick Barber was born on 8 May 1870 in Coventry, Summit, Ohio.1 He married Caroline Qualman on 25 January 1893 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 Frederick Barber died on 22 April 1929 at age 58 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.1

Children of Frederick Barber

Citations

  1. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Stuart Steingraber e-mail address.

Gertrude May Barber

F, #14881, b. 23 September 1889, d. 9 November 1947
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Gertrude May Barber was born on 23 September 1889 in Akron, Summit, Ohio. She married George William Ley on 10 November 1909 in Saint Bernard's Church, Akron, Summit, Ohio. Gertrude May Barber died on 9 November 1947 at age 58 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles, California.
     Her married name was Ley.

Citations

  1. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Stuart Steingraber e-mail address.

Harry Allyn Barber

M, #14882, b. 27 November 1866, d. 15 June 1942
ChartsDescendants of Jonathan Capron
     Harry Allyn Barber was born on 27 November 1866 in Akron, Summit, Ohio. He married Clara Belle Smith on 28 November 1888 in Akron, Summit, Ohio.1 Harry Allyn Barber died on 15 June 1942 at age 75 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles, California.1

Children of Harry Allyn Barber and Clara Belle Smith

Citations

  1. [S939] Research of others found on the internet. Files of Stuart Steingraber e-mail address.